Comalcalco Clayton

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The site of Comalcalco, whose coordinates are 18°16′N 93°10′W, is notable for two characteristics. First, it is the westernmost known Maya settlement. Second, and due to a dearth of locally available limestone (the primary material used in architectural construction), the city’s buildings were made from fired-clay bricks held together with mortar made from oyster shells. The use of bricks at Comalcalco was unique among all the Mayan sites. Many of the bricks are decorated with iconography and/or hieroglyphs. Important architectural features include the northern plaza and two pyramids. The two pyramids  was important to the site because the bricks that construct the pyramids are far different from any other Mayan site. Due to the fact that Comalcalco had no direct resource of limestone they had to build their structures with a different kind of stone and they chose a local clay and fired them turning them into bricks. They were called “tabiques”. Later archeologists discovered that they bricks had hidden inscriptions on them. Sadly the stucco reserves on the bricks were poorly preserved. The name Comalcalco literally means “the house of the comals” a comal is a pan used to cook tortillas.

 

Bibliography:  

Thompson, J. Eric S. Maya History and Religion. Norman: University of Oklahoma, 1970. Print.
 
Stephenson, Mark. “Comalcalco.” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 26 Feb. 2012. Web. 29 Feb. 2012. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comalcalco&gt;.
 
Steede. Neil; “The Bricks of Comalcalco,” Ancient American, 1:8, September/October 1994. 2. Fell, Barry; “The Comalcalco Bricks: Part 1, the Roman Phase,” Occasional Papers, Epigraphic Society, 19:299, 1990.
 
 
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Comalcalco Clayton

The site of Comalcalco, whose coordinates are 18°16′N 93°10′W, is notable for two characteristics. First, it is the westernmost known Maya settlement. Second, and due to a dearth of locally available limestone (the primary material used in architectural construction), the city’s buildings were made from fired-clay bricks held together with mortar made from oyster shells. The use of bricks at Comalcalco was unique among all the Mayan sites. Many of the bricks are decorated with iconography and/or hieroglyphs. Important architectural features include the northern plaza and two pyramids. The two pyramids  was important to the site because the bricks that construct the pyramids are far different from any other Mayan site. Due to the fact that Comalcalco had no direct resource of limestone they had to build their structures with a different kind of stone and they chose a local clay and fired them turning them into bricks. They were called “tabiques”. Later archeologists discovered that they bricks had hidden inscriptions on them. Sadly the stucco reserves on the bricks were poorly preserved. The name Comalcalco literally means “the house of the comals” a comal is a pan used to cook tortillas.

 

Bibliography:  

Thompson, J. Eric S. Maya History and Religion. Norman: University of Oklahoma, 1970. Print.
 
Stephenson, Mark. “Comalcalco.” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 26 Feb. 2012. Web. 29 Feb. 2012. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comalcalco&gt;.
 
Steede. Neil; “The Bricks of Comalcalco,” Ancient American, 1:8, September/October 1994. 2. Fell, Barry; “The Comalcalco Bricks: Part 1, the Roman Phase,” Occasional Papers, Epigraphic Society, 19:299, 1990.
 
 
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Comalcalco Clayton

The site of Comalcalco, whose coordinates are 18°16′N 93°10′W, is notable for two characteristics. First, it is the westernmost known Maya settlement. Second, and due to a dearth of locally available limestone (the primary material used in architectural construction), the city’s buildings were made from fired-clay bricks held together with mortar made from oyster shells. The use of bricks at Comalcalco was unique among all the Mayan sites. Many of the bricks are decorated with iconography and/or hieroglyphs. Important architectural features include the northern plaza and two pyramids. The two pyramids  was important to the site because the bricks that construct the pyramids are far different from any other Mayan site. Due to the fact that Comalcalco had no direct resource of limestone they had to build their structures with a different kind of stone and they chose a local clay and fired them turning them into bricks. They were called “tabiques”. Later archeologists discovered that they bricks had hidden inscriptions on them. Sadly the stucco reserves on the bricks were poorly preserved. The name Comalcalco literally means “the house of the comals” a comal is a pan used to cook tortillas.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Comalcalco Clayton

The site of Comalcalco, whose coordinates are 18°16′N 93°10′W, is notable for two characteristics. First, it is the westernmost known Maya settlement. Second, and due to a dearth of locally available limestone (the primary material used in architectural construction), the city’s buildings were made from fired-clay bricks held together with mortar made from oyster shells. The use of bricks at Comalcalco was unique among all the Mayan sites. Many of the bricks are decorated with iconography and/or hieroglyphs. Important architectural features include the northern plaza and two pyramids. The two pyramids  was important to the site because the bricks that construct the pyramids are far different from any other Mayan site. Due to the fact that Comalcalco had no direct resource of limestone they had to build their structures with a different kind of stone and they chose a local clay and fired them turning them into bricks. They were called “tabiques”. Later archeologists discovered that they bricks had hidden inscriptions on them. Sadly the stucco reserves on the bricks were poorly preserved. The name Comalcalco literally means “the house of the comals” a comal is a pan used to cook tortillas

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Comalcalco Clayton

The site of Comalcalco, whose coordinates are 18°16′N 93°10′W, is notable for two characteristics. First, it is the westernmost known Maya settlement. Second, and due to a dearth of locally available limestone (the primary material used in architectural construction), the city’s buildings were made from fired-clay bricks held together with mortar made from oyster shells. The use of bricks at Comalcalco was unique among all the Mayan sites. Many of the bricks are decorated with iconography and/or hieroglyphs. Important architectural features include the northern plaza and two pyramids. The two pyramids  was important to the site because the bricks that construct the pyramids are far different from any other Mayan site. Due to the fact that Comalcalco had no direct resource of limestone they had to build their structures with a different kind of stone and they chose a local clay and fired them turning them into bricks. They were called “tabiques”. Later archeologists discovered that they bricks had hidden inscriptions on them.

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Comalcalco Clayton

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Concoria Not the First Sunk by Treacherous Reef Clayton

After a captain named Francesco Schettino sunk in the treacherous reef off the coast of Tuscan island of Giglio. More than a dozen of ancient ships, ranging from the‭ ‬oldest deep-water wreck in history to late Roman imperial vessels, rest in Giglio’s treacherous waters. They are very sharp rocks and havae sunk many ships. Francesco lost his ship in the rocks, ripping a huge gash in the hull that sent the 114,500-ton vessel tumbling onto its side. A third-century Roman cargo vessel sank in a similar way to the Costa Concordia’s accident.

http://news.discovery.com/history/concordia-reef-120207.html

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Bird Mummies: Clayton

There was a CT-scan-based 3D reconstruction of an adult ibis mummy. It was from the ancient Egyptian city of Abydos. The mummy shows that snails were inserted inside the bird via incision. When the ibis was sacrificed, its last meal and stomach would have been removed and then carefully replaced during the mummification process. The bird is one of three sacred ibis mummies aged between 2,600 and 2,000 years that were found to have been packed with food for the afterlife. Other ibis mummy snacks identified in the new study include cereal grains and small vertebrates such as fish.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/02/pictures/120207-egypt-bird-mummies-snails-fed-science-ibis-ancient/

 

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I call this.

 

http://news.discovery.com/history/jewish-kosher-bread-stamp-discovered-120110.html

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Current Event Clayton

I call ‘Stone Age Cave Painters were Realists’

http://news.discovery.com/history/cave-men-paint-real-horses-111108.html

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